Culture        0  349 reads

1) General culture

Education

 

Adjusted savings;
 education expenditure > % of GNI

5.05 % of GNI

[52nd of 168]

Average years of schooling of adults

3.2

[81st of 100]

Children out of school, primary

113,349

[27th of 126]

Duration of compulsory education

8 years

[117th of 171]

Duration of education > Primary level

4

[173rd of 181]

Duration of education > Secondary level

8

[16th of 181]

Education enrolment by level > Tertiary level

4,565

[120th of 150]

Education spending (% of GDP)

6%

[32nd of 132]

Education, primary completion rate

57

[104th of 148]

Enrolment ratio > Secondary level

24.9%

[113rd of 135]

Female enrolment share > Primary level

48.9%

[35th of 176]

Female enrolment share > Secondary level

42.7%

[144th of 170]

Geographical aptitude results

70.189

[93rd of 191]

Illiteracy rates by sex, aged 15+

37.3%

[29th of 138]

Primary school girls out of school

46%

[26th of 99]

Public spending on education, total > % of government expenditure

24.58 %

[6th of 103]

Public spending per student > Primary level

8.2

[102nd of 126]

Pupil-teacher ratio, primary

63.63

[6th of 159]

Tertiary enrollment

0.3%

[152nd of 151]

Women to men parity index, as ratio of literacy rates, aged 15-24

0.86

[2nd of 138]

 

Health
 

Adjusted savings;
 education expenditure > % of GNI

5.05 % of GNI

[52nd of 168]

Average years of schooling of adults

3.2

[81st of 100]

Children out of school, primary

113,349

[27th of 126]

Duration of compulsory education

8 years

[117th of 171]

Duration of education > Primary level

4

[173rd of 181]

Duration of education > Secondary level

8

[16th of 181]

Education enrolment by level > Tertiary level

4,565

[120th of 150]

Education spending (% of GDP)

6%

[32nd of 132]

Education, primary completion rate

57

[104th of 148]

Enrolment ratio > Secondary level

24.9%

[113rd of 135]

Female enrolment share > Primary level

48.9%

[35th of 176]

Female enrolment share > Secondary level

42.7%

[144th of 170]

Geographical aptitude results

70.189

[93rd of 191]

Illiteracy rates by sex, aged 15+

37.3%

[29th of 138]

Primary school girls out of school

46%

[26th of 99]

Public spending on education, total > % of government expenditure

24.58 %

[6th of 103]

Public spending per student > Primary level

8.2

[102nd of 126]

Pupil-teacher ratio, primary

63.63

[6th of 159]

Tertiary enrollment

0.3%

[152nd of 151]

Women to men parity index, as ratio of literacy rates, aged 15-24

0.86

[2nd of 138]

 

Sports
 

British Commonwealth Games > Medals > Pos

22

[5th of 24]

FIFA World Ranking > Men

446

[101st of 198]

International Cricket Council members > Affiliate Members > Member Since

2003

 



Food

 

beverages and tobacco > % of value added in manufacturing

261.94 %

[1st of 103]

exports > % of merchandise exports

79.54 %

[5th of 156]



Language

 

English speakers

16,000

[20th of 52]

    English speakers (per $ GDP)

0.088 per $10,000 of GDP

[13th of 35]

English status
Official language . Bible 1535-1989.

English-speaking population > First language

16,000

[24th of 62]

English-speaking population > Total

16,000

[62nd of 99]

Languages of the African Union > Illiteracy > Literacy rate

64.1

[142nd of 174]



2) Religion
 

Catholic > Diocesan priests

277

[62nd of 143]

Catholic > Dioceses

7

[81st of 150]

Catholic > Parishes

153

[77th of 149]

Catholic > Religious Priests

191

[63rd of 148]

Catholic > Total Priests

468

[66th of 149]

Catholics

2,802,000

[55th of 140]

Catholics as percentage

19.57

[72nd of 150]

Islam > Percentage Muslim

20%

[63rd of 168]

Islam > Population

2,431,784

[55th of 165]

Islam in Africa > Islamic population in Africa and population percentage > Population

20 %

[27th of 45]

Jehovahs Witnesses

65,702

[26th of 178]

Protestantism > By country > Protestants

4,316,418

[27th of 167]

Protestantism > By country > Protestants > % Protestant

35.5 %

[31st of 163]

Religions > All
Christian 79.9%, Muslim 12.8%, other 3%, none 4.3% (1998 census)

Religions > Muslim

12.8 %

[62nd of 100]

Roman Catholicism > By country > Roman Catholicism > % Catholic

19.57 %

[75th of 170]

Roman Catholicism > By country > Roman Catholicism > Catholic total

2,379,501

[61st of 170]

Seventh-day Adventist Membership

241,115

[17th of 232]



3) Media

 

Average cost of local call

0.02

[137th of 151]

Book production, titles by the Universal Decimal Classification > Applied sciences

5

[70th of 77]

Book production, titles by the Universal Decimal Classification > Arts and recreation

3

[71st of 72]

Book production, titles by the Universal Decimal Classification > Literature

14

[65th of 77]

Book production, titles by the Universal Decimal Classification > Religion, theology

1

[73rd of 73]

DVD region

5

[54th of 171]

Fixed line and mobile phone subscribers > per 1,000 people

41.29 per 1,000 people

[133rd of 193]

Households with television > %

3 %

[137th of 160]

Mobile phone subscribers

429,305

[125th of 198]

Newspapers and periodicals > Circulation > Daily

26,000

[77th of 90]

Newspapers and periodicals > Number of titles > Daily

5

[73rd of 106]

Number of PCs

20

[150th of 169]

Personal computers

25,100

[53rd of 164]

Phone subscribers

10.58

[166th of 178]

Radio broadcast stations
AM 9, FM 5 (plus 15 repeater stations), shortwave 2 (plus one shortwave station on standby)

Radio receivers

2,600,000

[81st of 188]

Radios

2,600,000

[83rd of 221]

Telephone system > Regulation

1998

 

Television broadcast stations

1

[35th of 89]

Television standard > VHF

PAL B

 


Internet
 

Broadband subscribers

404

[104th of 117]

Country code

.mw

 

Hosts

107

[187th of 228]

International Internet bandwidth > Mbps

19.49 Mbps

[73rd of 167]

Internet Service Providers

3

[137th of 229]

ISP

3

[10th of 162]

Livejournal users

15

[219th of 226]

Price basket for Internet > US$ per month

41.92 $/month

[36th of 180]

Secure Internet servers

2

[155th of 183]

TLD

.mw

 

Users

139,500

[117th of 190]

 

4) Tourism

1. Lake Malawi
Constituting one-fifth of Malawi by itself, Lake Malawi is hard to miss. It’s an excellent spot for watching eagles, kingfishers, and cormorants diving for fish, and the lake is popular with swimmers, snorkelers, and scuba divers. The best way to explore the lake is by organizing a trip through a reputable tour group; check with your hotel and do your research.

2. Viphya Plateau
If hiking and biking are more your style, then the Viphya Plateau is the place for you. Despite the “plateau” moniker, this area has rolling hills, valleys, and forests and is a great place to cool off for a few days as you explore the numerous walking trails. We recommend checking out Viphya Forest, the largest manmade forest in Africa.

3. Mount Mulanje
Rising more than 9,000 feet (2,743 meters) into the air in southeastern Malawi is Mount Mulanje, a large granite massif, popular with rock climbers and backpackers alike. A system of trails leads up Mount Mulanje, covered in beautiful and fragrant cedars. For overnight travelers, there are sleeping huts along the trails. At the top of the mountain are views of tea fields and, on a clear day, neighboring Mozambique. We recommend traveling with a guide; check weather conditions before you set off, as temperatures can drop unexpectedly.

4. Liwonde National Park
At the southern end of Lake Malawi is one of the country’s best-known parks. Running through Liwonde is the Shire River, a natural attraction for crocodiles and hippopotamuses. The park’s most notable residents are elephants, though, hundreds of them; you won’t miss a sighting. The park covers more than 200 square miles (322 kilometers,) so it is worth spending a few days there and hiring a guide to show you show you as much as possible. Get ready to spot the Big Five, the five animals considered the most difficult to hunt—lions, African elephants, Cape buffalo, leopards, and the black rhinoceros.

5. Likoma Island
This site is one of the continent’s most beautiful islands, home to an abundance of baobab trees. From Likoma Island, one can spot Mozambique, and there are excellent opportunities for snorkeling and scuba diving in Lake Nyasa. Although swimming in Lake Nyasa can be one of the most refreshing activities of the day, always ask the locals where the best places are ; you won’t want to intrude on a group of crocodiles.

6. Old Town Lilongwe
The Old Town of the nation’s capital is a great place to explore markets, view mosques, and grab a bite to eat as you make your way to Lake Malawi. Try to get to the neighborhood’s food market early in the morning, so that you can see merchants preparing fresh fish. Numerous restaurants exist throughout the city, so take your pick and load up before heading out.

7. Nyika National Park
Nyika, the largest national park in Malawi, located in the northern region of the country, is home to the biggest concentration of leopards in the country, in addition to the many zebras, antelope, and warthogs that run free throughout the park. Because of its altitude, this park is one of the cooler areas in Malawi, and we recommend planning your visit for between November and May. By contrast with most safaris, you can take a walking safari of the park as there are no lions in the area, but you shouldn’t be overconfident;
 you must be accompanied by an experienced guide.

8. Cape Maclear
Ironically, a place that was once reputed to be a quiet fishing town on Lake Malawi is now one of the largest backpacker destinations in the country. Cape Maclear is rich in guest houses, restaurants, and activities for visitors to engage in. You can watch the fishermen collect the day’s catch, go snorkeling, or take a kayak out on the water. Try some fresh fish for dinner, and then grab a beer at a local bar before enjoying a good night’s sleep under the stars.

9. Blantyre
As Malawi’s most populated city and the country’s center of commerce, it is worth at least a day’s stop; it has a goodly-size array of decent-priced hotels and dining options. Shopping abounds, and if you are feeling up for it, hire a guide and explore the three peaks around the city, Soche, Ndirande, and Michiru. Be sure to plan a cuppa with some of the locally grown tea before continuing on your journey.

10. Livingstonia

Founded by Scottish missionaries in the 1890s, Livingstonia gives you an idea of what colonial Malawi looked and felt like. With beautiful redbrick architecture and picturesque surroundings, Livingstonia is a place to relax after a period of hiking and exploring. Be sure to check out the town’s main church and also local shops for carved wooden souvenirs. If you are interested in learning more about missionaries in Malawi, especially in Livingstonia, be sure to visit the Stone House museum.

When to Go
With elevations of as much as 10,000 feet in the mountainous regions and valleys as low as 600 feet, Malawi has a diverse climate. Without a doubt, the best time to visit the country is during the dry season, May through October, when it’s hot during the day and cooler at night. While this weather is conducive to exploring the outdoors, a visit during the rainy season (November through March and April) will mean fewer tourists and an opportunity to see the country’s fauna at its finest. Just make sure you come prepared with rain gear;
 low-lying areas, such as the Shire Valley, tend to become their hottest and most humid during the rainy season. Also, the mountainous areas in the south are some of the wettest in all Africa, with an average annual rainfall of between 60 and 80 inches.

If you are looking for arts-based events, check out the amazing Lake of Stars Malawi music festival, which takes place this year October 15–17 on Lake Malawi. Held in one of the most intimate settings in the world, this festival offers music and art by some of the best performers from Malawi and the rest of the African continent.

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